Individuals with disabilities who believe they would benefit from an ESA letter, must have a prescription document from a licensed mental health professional.  This letter would be based on the results of our ESA questionnaire, as well as a discussion with our qualified Florida therapist.
The National Institute of Mental Health shows that more than 1 in 4 adults in the U.S. have some form of mental health issue. 


Qualifying conditions for an ESA letter may include:

  • Mood disorders
  • Phobias or fears
  • Obsessive thoughts
  • Worrying
  • Loneliness
  • Nervousness or anxiety
  • Depression
  • Panic attacks
  • Uncomfortable in crowds
  • Separation anxiety
  • Changes in your life that are causing an emotional reaction
  • Difficulty getting or staying asleep
  • Post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD)
  • Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD)
  • Autism
  • Intellectual disability
  • Suicidal thoughts/tendencies
  • Migraine headaches

Even though this is a list of some of the more common issues associated with ESA's, this should not be construed as a comprehensive list of ALL qualifying diagnoses because there are too many to list on this page.

While ESAs may become like members of an individual’s family, they should not be confused with traditional pets.

ESAs provide a very specific service as an emotional support animal, and there are specific laws that govern their help. Click here to read more.

 

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Be Advised:

According to Florida law, "a person who knowingly and willfully misrepresents herself or himself, through conduct or verbal or written notice, as using a service animal and being qualified to use a service animal or as a trainer of a service animal commits a misdemeanor of the second degree, punishable as provided in s. 775.082 or s. 775.083 and must perform 30 hours of community service for an organization that serves individuals with disabilities, or for another entity or organization at the discretion of the court, to be completed in not more than 6 months." - 2016 Florida Statutes, 413.08 (9).